Thoreau Information on other sites...
"There is hardly an ism of our times that has not attempted to adopt Thoreau" - Walter Harding 
Thoreau sites with substantial original content
Pages that explore Thoreau's connections to eastern religion
Links for specific works of Thoreau (separate page)

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Library of Congress: Today in History: July 12th - (may not work for older browsers) "Thoreau's advocacy of simple, principled living remains compelling, while his writings on the relationship between people and the environment helped define the nature essay." 
Henry David Thoreau Navigator: A list of resources from around the Web about Henry David Thoreau as selected by researchers and editors of The New York Times.
I Hear American Singing - Thomas Hampson - "poet, philosopher, naturalist, essayist and educator, Thoreau represents one of the most authentic and individualist voices in all American thought." 
"Easily wearing the different hats of scientist, then poet, philosopher and ecologist, Thoreau spent his days in the woods proving that life could be extremely simple, and still completely fulfilling."
Thoreau kindles awareness - "It’s refreshing to read high-schoolers getting excited about writing, thinking, even about “being awake” in the philosophical sense. It’s even better when it’s Thoreau who turns them on – or who wakes up their minds and souls, rather."
Henry David Thoreau - in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - "... an American philosopher, poet, and environmental scientist whose major work, Walden, draws upon these several identities in meditating on the concrete problems of living in the world as a human being."
Thoreau's Pencils - John H. Lienhard - "Was the great transcendentalist, who rose above himself on the shores of Walden Pond, a successful inventor? Was this the same man who formulated the idea of civil disobedience? ... who so effectively armed Gandhi and Martin Luther King?" 
Henry David Thoreau: Libertarian - James Ostrowski - "America treats Henry David Thoreau like it treats its other libertarian heroes: it ignores their radical libertarian side."
Thoreau as Botanist - by Ray Angelo - "During the early 1850s Thoreau's passion for recording flowering dates and leafing of woody plants dawns. He described the great lengths he went to at times to ascertain the exact date a particular flower opened – 'running to different sides of the town and into neighboring towns, often between twenty and thirty miles in a day.'" 
Thoreau's Vision of Insects & the Origins of American Entomology - first chapter of a book by David Spooner - "Thoreau would bring to his records and observations of insects something lacking in all but the very greatest entomologists – vision." 
Famous Surveyors: Henry David Thoreau - "'He saw surveying as an opportunity to pursue his real interest: observing the natural world around him. 'Surveying,' he writes in the Journal, 'seems a noble employment which brings you within hearing of [the birds]'" - from Heritage Surveys 
Also: Henry David Thoreau Surveys - from the Concord Free Public Library 
Archeology In Concord: Thoreau and the Hunt House - by Bob Graham - "Two decades before Heinrich Schliemann ... become the "father of modern archeology," ... Henry David Thoreau ... was making a detailed observational inquiry into seventeenth century construction techniques" 
History of Vegetarianism: Thoreau - "I do not consider the other animals brutes in the common sense. I am attracted toward them undoubtedly because I never heard any nonsense from them." 
Henry David Thoreau and the American Indian - by Brianne Keith - "'Thoreau’s Indian Notebooks' have elicited a wide range of spirited responses from scholars.  These responses range from highly optimistic to dismissive." 
Emerson and Thoreau as American Prophets of Eco-wisdom - by Ann Woodlief - "His economic self-sufficiency may not transfer easily to an urbanized people ... but he had the right idea – to think, before you consume, of the consequences to your mental and spiritual health which depends so much on an intimate and moral, even 'humane', connection with nature."
Serene Outlaw: Henry David Thoreau in His Second Century - Douglas Herman - "Is it the discovery of so many memorable passages that affect us personally, or the insightfulness of Thoreau in a near-sighted world that makes such an indelible impression?"
Henry Thoreau as Remembered by a Young Friend - by Edward Emerson (1917) - "In childhood I had a friend, – not a house friend, domestic, stuffy in association; nor yet herdsman, or horseman, or farmer, or slave of bench, or shop, or office; nor of letters, nor art, nor society; but a free, friendly, youthful-seeming man, who wandered in from unknown woods or fields without knocking." 
"... the famed Transcendentalist thinker studied algebra, and assistant mathematics professor Steven Miller recently took an interest in his textbook, which is in the Brown archives. On this page, Thoreau worked through one of the exercises in the book, which is called Euler’s Algebra ... Miller says Thoreau’s jottings demonstrate a firm command of the material: “He was very thorough, pun intended."
Commemorating Concord - by Robert A. Gross - "Founded in 1635 as the first Puritan settlement above tidewater, the town appears connected to its past ... The historic center, which has evolved from the nucleated village planted by the original English settlers, still anchors the town." 
Thoreau's Life & Writings at the Thoreau Institute - the largest collection of Thoreau's writings on line, with works that can be hard to find, and the Thoreau Quotations Pages. 
The Thoreau Society - "Established in 1941, the Thoreau Society ... provides opportunities for all those interested in Thoreau – dedicated readers and followers, as well as the leading scholars in the field – to gather and share their knowledge of Thoreau and his times." 
"Richard Smith as Henry David Thoreau puts the 'living' in living history. For visitors, talking to Richard at The Old Manse is like returning to the Nineteenth Century." (more...)
The Concord Museum Thoreau collection, includes some of Thoreau's furniture, and his flute – click on "Thoreau Collection" on the upper left side of this page.
Autograph manuscript journal entry, Walden, 5 July 1845, at the Pierpont Morgan Library
Sites That Explore Thoreau's Connections to Eastern Religions
East Meets West - Swami B. G. Narasingha and Satyaraja dasa - "In his Journal, he wrote: 'One may discover the root of an Indian religion in his own private history, when, in the silent intervals of the day and night, he does sometimes inflict on himself like austerities with stern satisfaction.' No wonder Gandhi loved and revered him and accepted Thoreau as his teacher." 
Thoreau and Taoism - David T.Y. Ch'en - "To The Student of Thoreau who is familiar with Chinese culture, Walden is similar to a traditional Chinese government, Confucian in form and Taoist in spirit, for the book is full of quotations from the Confucian books, while its ideas are essentially Taoist. 
Thoreau The Buddhist - by Rick Fields - "One might say that Thoreau was pre-Buddhist ... He forecast an American Buddhism by the nature of his contemplation, in the same way that a certain quality of transparent predawn forecasts a clear morning." 
Vivekananda and Thoreau - by H. MacLachan - "The Hindu influence upon Thoreau had gone deep. ... He felt intuitively that the same inner spirit flowed through humanity and its environment alike, and in the Hindus he found this expressed as an article of faith." 
Thoreau sites with substantial original content
The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau is an ongoing project, working since 1966 to provider "a complete, definitive, annotated, and easily available edition" of Thoreau's writings, in thirty volumes. Interesting pages include a detailed biography, an essay on Walden, and an FAQ page: Was Thoreau involved in the Underground Railroad? Did Thoreau really start a major forest fire? What did Thoreau do for a living? Was Thoreau gay? and more...
The American Transcendentalist Web shows Henry in the context of an intellectual and religious movement. Guides to specific works have hypertext links to annotations and comments; look for the "web study text" links near the bottom of the page. 
The Thoreau Project at Calliope shows Thoreau in the context of a pivotal time in American history, and our view of the man expands accordingly. A color-coded timeline interweaves Henry's life with contemporary American and world events. Don't miss A Thoreau Christmas
Comments and questions to: rlenat@yahoo.com

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